Many parents and caregivers are unaware of furniture and TV tip-over dangers.

Learn How to Anchor It!

 
Child climbing on dresser with CRT TV perched on top

About the Campaign

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) launched the Anchor It! Campaign in 2015 to help educate parents and caregivers about the dangers of falling TVs and furniture. These incidents can be deadly, hidden home hazards. With rates of injuries and fatalities higher than most people imagine, the Anchor It! campaign is raising awareness and providing simple and inexpensive steps to help prevent furniture, TVs, and appliances from tipping over.

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Anchor It! Public Service Announcements

Anchor It! Collaborators

This campaign is only as successful as the people who share it with their communities. By joining as an Anchor It! collaborator, individuals, organizations, and companies receive campaign resources, quarterly updates from CPSC, and support to be leaders in their communities and sectors.

The campaign’s approximately 70 collaborators range from major, global furniture companies to child safety advocates and parents of children who have experienced a tip-over incident.

  • What Do Collaborators Do?

    Anchor It! collaborators join with CPSC to help raise awareness about the dangers of TV and furniture tip-over incidents. By sharing the campaign’s safety messages through their communications channels and using printed Anchor It! materials in their local communities, the Anchor It! community helps to educate more parents and caregivers about easy and inexpensive ways to protect children from tip-overs.

  • What Campaign Support Do You Recieve?

    As a collaborator with the Anchor It! Campaign, you’ll receive:

    • Support from CPSC in the form of free safety materials and website promotion
    • A chance to collaborate with CPSC to share tip-over safety messages
    • Guidance for additional education and awareness steps to take
    • Assistance sharing educational materials with individuals and organizations within your network
  • Who Are Our Collaborators?

    We have a diverse group of collaborators:

    • Aaryn Rubin
    • American Academy of Pediatrics
    • American Home Furnishings Alliance
    • Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago Injury Prevention and Research Center
    • Another Day, Another Chance Blog
    • Baby Proofing Montgomery
    • Bernie & Phyl’s Furniture
    • Beth Gniazdowski
    • Brace it for Brayden
    • Bush Industries
    • Bushwick Community Partnership
    • California Department of Public Health
    • Center for Injury Research & Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital
    • Charlie’s House
    • Chi Eta Phi Sorority, Inc.
    • Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Injury Prevention Center
    • Conner’s Legacy Foundation, Inc.
    • Cook Children’s Medical Center
    • Costco Wholesale
    • Crew Plus Two
    • Crystal Ellis
    • Danielle Henchcliffe
    • Debra Holtzman
    • Jaime Friedman
    • Full House Babyproofing
    • Golden-Fowler Home Furnishings
    • GooGooProof
    • Home Furnishings Association
    • Home Safe Home Childproofing
    • Home Safety and Health
    • Home Visiting Initiative, Massachusetts Department of Family Health
    • HOPES Program
    • Infant House
    • International Association for Child Safety
    • JA Assembly, Inc.
    • Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association
    • Keeping Infants + Kids Safe (KIKS)
    • Kensington Volunteer Fire Department
    • Kids in Danger
    • Mama Bear Cares
    • Meghan’s Hope
    • National Early Childhood Program Accreditation
    • National Foster Parent Association
    • National Organizations for Youth Safety
    • National Parenting Education Network
    • National Safety Council
    • NB Liebman Furniture
    • New York State Division of Consumer Protection
    • North Country Hospital
    • Oregon Head Start Association
    • Parent Support Program at Mujeres Latinas en Accion
    • Parents Against Tip-Overs (PAT)
    • Program for Early Parent Support
    • Rainbow Families
    • Roberts & Roberts Attorneys at Law
    • Ruby-Gordon Home
    • Safe and Sound with Amaya
    • Safe Kids Capital Region
    • Safe Kids DC/Children’s National Health System
    • Safe Kids Worldwide
    • Safe States Alliance
    • Salud America!
    • Shane’s Foundation
    • SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital Safety Program
    • Sylvia Santiago
    • The LifTed, LLC
    • Vaida’s Story
    • Ventanillas de Salud (Government of Mexico)
    • Vision y Compromiso
    • Walmart
  • How Can You Get Involved?

    Getting involved is easy. If you’re interested in becoming an Anchor It! Campaign collaborator or have questions about the campaign, contact us.


Anchor It! and CPSC Facts

The following key findings come from CPSC’s Product Instability or Tip-Over Injuries and Fatalities Associated With Televisions, Furniture, and Appliances: 2020 Report.

11,300

Between 2017 and 2019, an estimated 11,300 children were treated in hospital emergency rooms yearly due to furniture, TV, and appliance tip-overs.

77%

Between 2000 and 2019, 77% of all furniture, TV, and appliance tip-over fatalities involved children under 6 years old.

89%

Between 2000 and 2019, 89% of tip-over-related fatalities among minors (under 18) involved children under 5 years old.

91%

91% of reported tip-over fatalities occurred inside a home.

50%

50% of all fatalities involving children occurred in bedrooms, with the next closest – 22% – in living/family rooms.

73%

73% of child fatalities involved climbing or the application of force.

27%

27% of child fatalities were reported as unknown scenarios, which commonly happened when the child was alone in a room.

75%

75% of child fatalities involve a TV alone or furniture and a TV together. A TV falling from an average-sized dresser delivers a force of several hundred pounds.

59%

For children, the head is the most common body part injured in tip-over incidents treated in the emergency room. 59% of child fatalities were due to crushing.

*NOTE: Statistics related to deaths are based on 2000-2019 reported data; statistics related to injuries are based on 2017-2019 reported data.